tony

Tony Zampella

About Tony Zampella

Tony Zampella serves as the designer of learning programs at Zampella Group. He is an instructor, researcher and developer of learning programs and practices to develop mindsets for creating leadership cultures. His studies include the work of Martin Heidegger and ontological inquiry, Ken Wilber and integral theory, and Zen Buddhism.

COVID-19 Reveals the Nature of Uncertainty

Uncertainty causes panic.

This seems to be the mantra right now. It makes sense and also reveals a hidden truth: that we expect certainty. That without it, panic arises.

A challenging truth to absorb is that the very certainty we expect or need may also be a source of our suffering. The issue here is not certainty itself, but the need for certainty.

Our attachment to needs—growing to expect them—can find us lost in their absence.

Rather than continuing to fill these needs, how might we dissolve them? What would evolving beyond them make possible?

Certainty, Uncertainty, and Information

In the DOWNLOAD PDF

By |2020-04-06T14:46:24-04:00April 6th, 2020|Blog|0 Comments

The Experience of Being in 12 Practices, part 2

What is the experience of being? I explored this inquiry in a two-part blog. In part one, I explored an interdependent understanding of being. In this blog, part two, I will introduce the 12 practices that support this new understanding of being.

This new dimension of being views humans as co-creators of our world. However, most psychological models relating to the self and human functioning imply that the self exists as a discrete, separate, and independent entity. Therefore, learning professionals, seldom appreciate this interdependent nature of being nor the generative capacity it reveals. They both impact learning DOWNLOAD PDF

By |2020-04-07T10:47:07-04:00February 24th, 2020|Blog|0 Comments

The Experience of Being in 12 Practices – Part 1

Have you ever attended a seminar that offered prescriptive behaviors to adopt, processes to implement and content to remember? I recently had this experience.

What’s missing from this scenario depends somewhat on our expectations of learning and, more importantly, our view of being human. Do we react to, manage, or adopt change? Or are we co-creators of change?

To accept the former view implies an understanding of being human as fixed, separate selves, independent of our circumstances that respond to change.

If we accept the latter view, as co-creators, we shift:

  • From doling out prescriptive behaviors, adopting “norms” to conform
  • To discovering DOWNLOAD PDF
By |2020-03-30T15:16:16-04:00February 10th, 2020|Blog|0 Comments