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Tony Zampella

About Tony Zampella

Tony Zampella serves as the designer of learning programs at Zampella Group. He is an instructor, researcher and developer of learning programs and practices to develop mindsets for creating leadership cultures. His studies include the work of Martin Heidegger and ontological inquiry, Ken Wilber and integral theory, and Zen Buddhism.

A New Direction and Challenge Awaits the New Year

A new year often heralds announcements. True to form, I wish to use this space to announce our new direction, which will begin to unfold this week.

About three years ago, our team realized through our teaching, research, and client services that conventional notions of leadership—even the more innovative versions—were failing to manage the effects of our pace of change and information overload.

We recognized that the disruptive nature of change—especially as it relates to coaches, educators, and executives (our client base)—and its unintended consequences demanded greater attention and inquiry.

Leadership development today requires more than strategies for dealing with product life cycles, DOWNLOAD PDF

By | January 7th, 2019|Blog|0 Comments

Silent Night, Wholly Life

As we end another year, it seems natural to reflect on it. We take inventory, question assumptions, and pause. The notion of reflection requires a relationship with silence, a willingness to cultivate and appreciate moments of silence.

Silence can be a confusing topic—it may also be our best teacher.

In working with clients — coaching, and facilitating practice and meditation sessions — the idea of sitting in silence has surfaced, with appreciation for some and anxiety for many.

Some professionals become anxious in silence. They may not know themselves without the many distractions that invade our minds. Technology and related chatter are becoming systematically DOWNLOAD PDF

By | December 18th, 2018|Blog|0 Comments

Move Fast and Break Things: Had Enough, Yet!?

“Move Fast and Break Things,” coined by innovation guru and Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen, has become the ideology for disruptive innovation.

Reid Hoffman, co-founder of LinkedIn and PayPal and a venture capitalist, endorses it in his new book Blitzscaling. For Hoffman, “blitzscaling” (or moving fast and breaking things) involves releasing beta versions of products, then fixing and financing them as you grow—with an emphasis on scaling fast and first—to achieve first-mover advantage.

Go Big or Go Home

First-mover advantage confers many benefits on innovators who win rights to new territory and define the rules, roles, and DOWNLOAD PDF

By | November 29th, 2018|Blog|0 Comments