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Wisdom Warrior #1: Certainty v. Clarity

“Wisdom Warrior” is an odd name.

It combines two seemingly contradictory terms. This is precisely where wisdom exists—beyond knowledge or the practical—with tensions at the intersection of paradoxes, opposites, or contradictions.

Warriors have a steely mastery that focuses on the battle at hand. Our battle involves the clouded mind that often conceals important wisdom.

Holding these tensions can often question our thinking, cultivate our minds, and expand our views.

This blog begins a series to distinguish specific items that can support cultivating wisdom. Each item, labeled “Wisdom Warrior” will inquire into a specific “tension” or idea. In this case: Certainty v. Clarity.

By | May 13th, 2019|Blog|2 Comments

Imagination is Key to Rethinking Stale Business Formulas

Would you rather be stuck in an elevator or listen to an elevator pitch? This is a tough call for me: both evoke stressful situations.

My niece—a young, brilliant artist—recently graduated from a design school with a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She graduated armed with two formulas to sell her services in the “real world”: mastering the elevator pitch and finding your customer’s “pain points.”

Did I mention she graduated from an art school?

Some of our business concepts can offer real solutions, but others can be reductive and can pollute education, learning, and the human spirit.

Two such ideas include the elevator pitch DOWNLOAD PDF

By | April 22nd, 2019|Blog|0 Comments

The Practice of Choosing Wisely

You get one marshmallow now or two in an hour. I remember this test, which proved a valuable point about emotional intelligence: that our temperament can forecast future success. Delaying immediate gratification paid more dividends—even more than IQ—to one’s success.

This seems a quaint notion now, a quarter-century later, as we experience an abundance of information and daily inundation of content with a profusion of choices.

Perhaps the most important capacity today is the capacity to choose wisely.

Choosing requires the judgment to sort priorities. Without it, everything appears the same and becomes an emergency to do now (lacking priority).

Coaches and consultants DOWNLOAD PDF

By | April 1st, 2019|Blog|0 Comments